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Special Report | February 2014

Promoting the culture of energy efficiency

The Ministry of Environment and Forests' Rs 128 crore Indira Paryavaran Bhawan is India's first zero energy building to meet the annual requirement of 14 lakh units of electricity. PROJECTS INFO reports.  

Materials

 
     
  • Ready Mix Concrete with PPC having more than 30 per cent fly ash content
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  • Stone available in nearby area for flooring
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  • Terrazzo flooring with locally available stone materials
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  • Fly ash brick
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  • AAC blocks
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  • Jute bamboo composite for door frames and shutters
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  • UPVC windows with double hermetic sealing using low heat
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  • transmittance index glass
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  • Use of high reflectance terrace tiles for low heat ingress
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  • Aluminum avoided as it has high embedded energy
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  • Grass paver blocks for ground water recharge
 

Named after India's former Prime Minister, Indira Paryavaran Bhawan in New Delhi is a project of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) for the construction of a new office building at Aliganj, Jor Bagh Road, New Delhi. The basic design concept of the project is to make a net zero energy green building. The building is targeted to achieve Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) India Platinum Rating and Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA) five star rating. It is all set to achieve high energy-savings goals, featuring innovative solutions for solar energy production, maximum energy saving and minimum energy requirements.

 

The total cost of the project is estimated to be Rs 128.63 crore, and the building is an RCC framed structure with three basements and two blocks one of G+6 and other of G+7. Total plot area is 9,565.13 sq m, basement area is 11,826 sq m, super structure area is 19,088 sq m, and the total plinth area is 30,914 sq m.

 

The building is planned to be a state-of-the-art landmark building, with emphasis on conservation of natural areas and trees to reduce adverse environmental impact, provide adequate natural light, shaded landscaped areas to reduce ambient temperature, maximise energy saving systems and minimise operation cost by adopting green building concepts, conservation and optimisation of water requirement including reuse of water by recycling the waste water and also to make the building friendly to the physically challenged.

 

Many energy conservation measures have been adopted to optimise the overall design load and also meet the annual requirement of 14 lakh units of electricity. Therefore, the rooftop areas have been increased three-fold from 2,000 sq m to 6,000 sq m by building huge cantilevers so that enough monocrystalline solar PV panels can be installed. The solar power generated in the complex, built at an expense of Rs 200 crore, will be fed back to the NDMC grid from where supply is initially taken. Engineers who worked on the eight-storey building have stated that the estimated annual energy demand for a conventional complex of this size is 22 lakh units, but in this case it was reduced by 30 per cent by taking innovative measures.

 

So, the solar plant will have peak generation capacity to produce 930 kW power, wherein SunPower Solar's panels were used to cater to the high energy requirements. Also there are a number of features: energy efficient T-5 and LED fixtures, innovative chilled beam system for cooling and pre-cooling of fresh air from toilet exhaust using heat recovery wheel in order to reduce the load on the chiller plant. Water cooled chillers and double skin air handling units with variable frequency drives are planned to be installed. Geothermal heat exchange technology is also planned for heat rejection from the air-conditioning system. Innovative energy saving regenerative lifts will be installed for the first time in a government institutional building.

 

Water conservation measures will be adopted in the building like low discharge water fixtures and dual flushing cistern, low demand plants in landscaping, drip irrigation system for green areas, make-up water tank for chiller plant, irrigation, and rainwater harvesting system which leads to saving in fresh water requirement. Mechanised car parking will be provided with three-level underground parking in this building, which is being implemented for the first time in a government office building to accommodate parking space for 344 cars.

 

Innovation
 The world's highest efficiency commercially produced solar PV modules are used to have maximum energy from the available limited space unmatched by any other technology (44 per cent more power as compared to conventional solar panels). Also, the building's roof frame structure has been designed to accommodate solar panels installed on a 5 degree tilt mounting structure with the objective of maximising the installed solar power and the overall energy output. When operational in 2014, it will become the first Net-Zero energy building in India, with the energy produced by the SunPower solar panels covering the entire energy demand of the building, and will result in the reduction of 800 tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

 

A global commitment
 As part of the Central Public Works Department's (CPWD) mission and commitment to sustainable architecture, all the newly-built governmental properties in India have a minimum three-star rating from GRIHA. But Indira Paryavaran Bhawan raises the bar in terms of Green Building standards, as it is the first public building to generate power on-site and it is targeted to achieve both a five-star rating from GRIHA and Platinum Rating from LEED.

 

Landscaping
 In the landscape design proposal, an attempt has been made to represent the overall geographic regions of India, where each one has its own natural, ecological value which includes the northern mountains including the Himalayas and the northeast mountain ranges, the Indo-Gangetic plains, Thar Desert, Central Highlands and Deccan Plateau, East Coast, West Coast, and various islands. These regions will be represented in the form of plant material, rocks, artifacts and pictorial representation in and around the proposed building. The proposed plant material selection is based on MoEF's guidelines for different agro-climatic zones, a judicious mix of biodiversity value and aesthetics. The representation of plant elements in Delhi's extreme climate regime will be based on the various bio/phyto-geographic areas of the country to the extent possible. The tree components in the Paryavaran Bhawan complex will represent the indigenous flora of the country depending on adaptability to Delhi's climate.

 

Eastern side (Main entry area): Trees would be indigenous, with luxuriant flowering at the appropriate seasons to provide visual relief.

 

Northern Side (facing Jorbagh Road): The largest open space facing the main road having pedestrian entry will have representations of the northern mountain range and the Indo-Gangetic regions. This space will have space for public art to depict cultural ethos and biodiversity value.

 

Western side (facing BK Dutt colony): The narrow soft space available for plantation will represent the Deccan Plateau/Eastern Ghats. To screen off residential colonies and western sun in summers, evergreen trees with dense foliage will be planted which will act as a screen.

 

Southern Side (facing the proposed government residential colony): To allow sunlight, medium deciduous trees will be adopted, representing the other regions.

 

Central Courtyard: The thematic sections in the Central Courtyard area would include special plant groups such as palms, cycads and other tropical elements of high conservation value (e.g. medicinal ginger).

 

Water bodies will be introduced as a central feature to soothe micro climate and to introduce sound effects. Special attention will be given to the illumination of laid green areas with energy efficient lighting arrangements to create dramatic effects particularly in the Central Courtyard and terrace garden.

 

Terrace garden: A sandwich space in-between a gym and entertainment area at the seventh floor will be designed to provide relief and to refresh.

 

Water efficiency

 
     
  • Use of curing compound
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  • Low discharge fixtures
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  • Dual flushing cistern
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  • Drip irrigation
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  • Use of native species of shrubs and trees having low water demand in landscaping
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  • Low lawn area to reduce water demand
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  • Waste water treatment
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  • Reuse of treated water for irrigation and cooling towers for HVAC
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  • Rainwater harvesting
 

Energy efficiency

 
     
  • Energy efficient light fittings conforming to Energy Conservation Building Code, 2007 to reduce energy demand
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  • Water cooled chillers, double skin air handling units with variable frequency drives.
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  • Part condenser water heat rejection by geothermal mechanism. This will also help in water conservation in cooling towers for HVAC system.
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  • Integrated Building Management System (IBMS) for optimising energy consumption, performance monitoring, etc.
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  • High efficiency Cast Resin Dry Transformers for electric substation. DG sets for captive power generation.
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  • Regenerative lifts.
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  • Chilled beams save AHU/FCU fan power consumption by approximate 50 kW.
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  • Variable chilled water pumping system through VFD.
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  • VFD on cooling towers fans and AHU.
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  • Pre-cooling of fresh air from toilet exhaust air through sensible and latent heat energy recovery wheel.
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  • Entire hot water generation through solar panels.
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  • Use of energy efficient lighting fixtures with T-5 lamps.
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  • Use of Lux level sensor to optimise operation of artificial lighting.
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  • Control of HVAC equipment and monitoring of all systems through IBMS.
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  • Solar powered external lighting.
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  • On site renewable energy system with solar photovoltaic cells to meet total energy demand.
 

Innovation and design 

 
     
  • Geothermal heat rejection which will also help in water conservation in cooling towers for HVAC system.
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  • Chilled beam system for HVAC
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  • Regenerative lift
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  • High efficiency solar panel to meet total energy demand
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  • Mechanised car parking to optimise space and energy
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  • Low energy EM technology for bio-digestion of organic waste
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  • Solar passive design to reduce heat ingress in building envelope and allowing lighting to over 75 per cent of indoor area.
 

Site planning

 
     
  • A plot measuring 9,565 sq m carved out of 7.4 Ha. of land for construction of this new office building
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  • The land falls in Zone-D of the Zonal Plan. Land use of the entire land as per MPD-2021 was residential and changed to Government office for this piece of land. It is proposed to build GPRA on balance portion of land.
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  • The site is surrounded on the east by NDMC Housing and 15m. ROW, on the west by 12 m ROW and on North Lodhi Colony and 12m. ROW, on South GPRA colony of Aliganj. -√≤The plot is easily approachable from Aurobindo Marg and Lodhi Road.
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  • A metro station "Jorbagh" is at walkable distance of about 300 m from this place.
 

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